Powerful Integrated Voice

Research

 

PSE Information Systems: Asessing the Impact of Scaller on First-to-Second Semester Retention in Ontario Colleges

Published June 2014, Dr. Peter Dietsche,Former Davis Chair Community College Leadership, Asst. Prof. Higher Education, OISE/UT, President PSE Information Systems

Summary of Results

A comparison of retention rates for the Control and two Treatment Groups produced varied results in the individual college analyses. One college exhibited little difference across the three groups while in three colleges Treatment Group members who were contacted with Scaller™ exhibited increased retention rates of 5%, 5% and 9.7% compared to Treatment Group members who were not contacted. Two colleges also exhibited an increase in retention rate of 0.5% and 4.2%, respectively, for Treatment Group members contacted via Scaller™ compared to their Control Group.

Analyses of data for all colleges taken together showed an overall increase in second semester retention of 4.4% for Treatment Group members who were contacted with Scaller™ compared to those who were not. When compared to the Control Group, Treatment Group members who were contacted with Scaller™ exhibited a 0.4% increase in second semester retention.

Click here for full Executive Summary

For a review of the full report contact Gary Hannah, President and CEO at info@vocantas.com

Clinical Trials: Clinically Proven

Vocantas healthcare solutions have been used successfully in several independent clinical trials. Findings show that CallAssure makes automated patient monitoring achievable, resulting in increased patient safety, accurate records and accountability.

Published Clinical Trials using CallAssure

Effect of an Interactive Voice Response System on Oral Anticoagulant Management
Natalie Oake MSc, Carl van Walraven MD MSc, Marc A. Rodger MD MSc, Alan J. Forster MD MSc
Canadian Medical Association Journal Volume 180(9):927-33 - April 2009
Download PDF (238KB)

Automated Patient Assessments After Outpatient Surgery Using an Interactive Voice Response System
Dr. Alan J. Forster et al.
American Journal of Managed Care, Volume 14:429-436 - July 2008
Download PDF (230KB)

Using an Interactive Voice Response System to Improve Patient Safety Following Hospital Discharge
Alan J. Forster et al.
Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice ISSN 1356-1294 - July 2007
Download PDF (80KB)

Published Clinical trials using IVR (Interactive Voice Response)

Interactive voice response technology for symptom monitoring and as an adjunct to the treatment of chronic pain
Gregory Lieberman, BA and Magdalena R Naylor, MD, PhD
Translational Behavioural Medicine, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 93-101 - March 2012
Download PDF (350KB)

 

Articles

Giving Gen Y Freshman What They Really, Really Want
By Keri Fraser, VP of Marketing
Vocantas - July 2013
Download PDF (343KB)

Eight reasons SMS is Unacceptable for Critical Hospital Communications
Amcom Software - 2011
Download PDF (685KB)

New Prescription for Improved Patient Outcomes: Chronic Disease Management
Executive Healthcare Magazine - July 20, 2009
Download PDF (60KB)

IVR Goes Proactive
By Donna Fluss
ANSWER Stat - February/March 2009
Download PDF (75KB)

Tracking Pandemics the New School Way
By Briony Smith
itWorld Canada - September 2008
Download PDF (33KB)

Using IVR to Improve Post-Discharge Patient Care
By Gary Hannah
ANSWER Stat - August/September 2008
Download PDF (173KB)

Selling the Solution, Not the Box
by Sheila McGee-Smith, McGee-Smith Analytics
No Jitter - Feb 14, 2008
Download PDF (50KB)

Using an Interactive Voice Response System to Monitor Chronic Disease Patients
By Gary Hannah
Digital Health Care & Productivity.com - Jan. 8, 2008
Download PDF (22KB)

 

Research Highlights

  • Of the 96% of older patients who used CallAssure, 35% were identified as potentially having a health problem.
  • When a nurse followed up on those patients, the contact proactively identified the 25% of patients who needed some kind of additional care within 48 hours of discharge from the hospital.
  • The other 75% of patients went on with their day and the nurses were able to focus their attention on patients who needed their care.

Source: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice ISSN 1356-1294 - July 2007

Download PDF (80KB)